If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site

June 2019

Monday, 24 June 2019 00:00

Foot and Ankle Fractures

When the foot or ankle experiences trauma, a fracture may occur.  Causes of foot and ankle fractures can vary; in some cases, an obvious impact to the foot or a fall can be behind a fracture.  Alternatively, fractures can also occur because of increased stress on the bone over time.  The location of the fracture can often give your podiatrist information on how the fracture occurred.

Pain, especially when bearing weight, is a telltale sign of a fracture.  Limping due to this pain is a further sign of a foot or ankle fracture.  Other symptoms include inflammation, bruising, deformity, and tenderness.  A deformity may occur due to a shift in bone alignment or a joint dislocation near the fracture.  While pain is a significant symptom of breakage, a patient who has nerve damage or who has diabetes may not feel this pain.  In this instance, your podiatrist will look for additional signs to determine whether a fracture has occurred.

If you are experiencing severe pain, cannot walk without limping, have an open wound near the suspected break, or have numbness or tingling in the toes, you should see your podiatrist.

Monday, 17 June 2019 00:00

Sports Related Foot And Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are common among people who participate in sports. Several factors contribute to this. They include failing to stretch or warm up properly, not wearing the proper type of shoe and not taping or providing other types of support for the ankle or foot. The most common foot and ankle injuries suffered by people involved in sports are plantar fasciitis, ankle sprains and Achilles tendon damage or ruptures. If not treated properly, they can lead to permanent disability.

Treating these injuries is relatively simple if they are identified and addressed early. Many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains associated with injury as just soreness or tired muscles. Their first response is usually to try to work through it. This can lead to serious problems. Many minor injuries are made far more serious when athletes continue to put strain and pressure on them. That attitude can change a mild strain into a serious strain and a minor tear into a rupture. Athletes should have unusual aches and pains evaluated by a skilled medical professional.

Plantar fasciitis is a painful injury. It is inflammation of the plantar fascia, the thick band of tissue running from the heel to the base of the toes. If left untreated, it can lead to a degenerative disease called plantar fasciosis. There are several effective treatments for this ailment. Doctors often prescribe rest, massages, stretching, night splints, physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, corticosteroids or surgery, usually in that order. The most effective treatment for plantar fasciitis is orthotics, which offers foot support. Surgery is occasionally used as a last resort, but it comes with the risk of nerve damage and infection and often does not stop the pain.

The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body. It connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. Running, jumping and walking all impact this tendon. Two common injuries to the Achilles tendon are tendonitis and a rupture of the tendon. Tendonitis is inflammation in the tendon often caused by an increase in the amount of stress placed on it. Non-surgical treatments include rest, ice or anti-inflammatory medication.  A rupture (tear) of the Achilles tendon can be treated by placing the lower leg in a cast for several weeks or with surgery. Many physicians feel surgery is the better option because it lowers the risk of re-ruptures. Both methods require 4 to 6 months of rehabilitation.

Ankle sprains are the most common sports related foot and ankle injury. A sprain occurs when the ligament holding the ankle bones and joint stretches beyond its normal range. It can be treated non-surgically with a combination of rest, ice wrapped around the joint for 30 minutes immediately after injury, compression by a bandage and elevating the ankle above the heart for 48 hours. This combination is referred to as RICE. Severe ankle sprains in which the ligaments are torn may require reconstructive surgery followed by rehabilitation.

Monday, 10 June 2019 00:00

Flipping Out About Flip Flops

Although it may be tempting to wear flip-flops in warm weather, they are not the best choice of footwear for your feet. Flip-flops may be ideal for the beach, pool, spa, and shared showers, but you should avoid wearing them unless it is completely necessary.

Flip-flops only have a small strip of fabric holding your foot in place, but your toes need a better grip to keep your foot in place. The repetitive gripping can lead to an overuse of your muscles, which could result in tendinitis. This is only one of the many problems that stem from wearing flip-flops too often.

Flip flops aren’t good for extensive walking because they fail to offer arch support, heel cushioning, or shock absorption. As a result, people who wear flip flops are at a higher risk of experiencing an ankle sprain. Additionally, these shoes offer little protection for your feet, putting those who wear them at a greater risk for stubbed toes, glass cuts, and puncture wounds.

Although flip flops aren’t recommended for everyday use by anyone, it is especially important for diabetics to avoid them. A diabetic foot injury can easily become very serious, and it may even lead to amputation.

If you are experiencing pain from wearing flip-flops, you shouldn’t be hesitant to replace them with a more comfortable shoe that offers more support. If your flip-flop foot pain doesn’t go away, you should seek assistance from a podiatrist right away. It is possible that you may have a more serious foot problem such as a stress fracture or arthritis.

Monday, 03 June 2019 00:00

Sever's Disease

Sever’s disease, also known as calcaneal apophysitis is a common bone disorder that occurs during childhood. The disease is defined as an inflammation of the growth plate in the heel. When a child has a growth spurt, his heel bone grows faster than the muscles, tendons, and ligaments in his leg. This disease is a result of overuse. The people who are most likely to be affected by this disease are children who are in a growth spurt, especially boys who are from the ages of 5 to 13 years old. 60% of children with Sever’s disease have both heels involved.

Symptoms of this disease are heel pain that intensifies during running and jumping activities. The pain is typically localized to the posterior part of the heel. Symptoms may be severe, and they can easily interfere with daily activities. Children who play soccer, baseball, and basketball are more likely to develop Sever’s disease.

Your doctor will diagnose your child based on his or her symptoms, x-rays are generally not helpful in diagnosing this disease. Your doctor may examine both heels and ask your child questions about his or her activity level in sports. Your doctor may then use the squeeze test on your child’s heel to see if there is any pain. Nevertheless, some doctors might still use x-rays to rule out any other issues such as fractures, infections, and tumors.

Sever’s disease can be prevented by maintaining good flexibility while your child is growing. Another prevention method is to wear good-quality shoes that have firm support and a shock-absorbent sole. Sever’s disease can be treated by ceasing any activity that causes heel pain. You should apply ice to the injured heel for 20 minutes 3 times a day. Additionally, orthotics should be used for children who have high arches, flat feet, or bowed legs.

If you suspect your child has Sever’s disease, you should make an appointment with your podiatrist to have his or her foot examined. Your doctor may recommend nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen or naproxen to relieve pain. In more severe cases, your child may need a cast to rest his or her heel. Fortunately, Sever’s disease does not cause long-term foot problems. After treatment, your child should start to feel better within two weeks to two months.

Connect with us